Plan to Use Multiple Channels for Your Year-End Appeal to Raise More Money

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How can using multiple communications channels dramatically enhance…

On-Line Gifts Can Put You Over the Top in the Last Days of December

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In our 09 Year-End Fundraising Strategies Telesummit interviews,…

How to Segment Your Donors for Year-End Fundraising Success

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Hi! Here's Year-End Fundraising Strategy #3 for the third of October. Looks like I just may be able to make my goal of 31 days - 31 blog posts on year-end strategies. I've gone through my notes from all the 09 Year-End Strategy Telesummit interviews and have organized them into categories that I think you'll find very, very useful. Just as a preview, here are some of the topics I'll discuss in October to help you reach your year-end fundraising goals: (Of course you can find out ALL the strategies by downloading the Telesummit expert interviews when they are posted on October 9):
  • how to talk about the economy so it doesn't backfire;
  • how to prep your donors for the ask;
  • 15 parts of the right appeal letter;
  • a followup strategy that will double your results
  • how to use social media to support/enhance your year-end fundraising;
  • creative ways to ask and receive;
  • lots of roles for board members that will help you raise more money
  • last minute strategies for the end of December;
  • how to make sure your face-to-face asks are successful.
Today, however, we are still in planning mode. iStock_000001923167XSmallWe have about 10 weeks to zoom in on our year-end fundraising goal and there's no time to waste. Let's start with segmenting your appeal list. You'll want to plan different appeals to different sections of donors. The whole idea of segmenting is to help you personalize your appeal to your dear, wonderful donors. You divide your donor list into groups with similar characteristics. This allows you to create a more customized appeal that reflects the personality profile of that group of donors. Let's just think about all the ways you might want to segment your list.

Prevent Donor Attrition and Keep Your Donors

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I had the pleasure of interviewing Simone Joyeaux, one of the great fundraising gurus of all time, this morning for the Telesummit on Fall 09 Fundraising Strategies. When I asked Simone to comment on the difficult giving environment for this fall, she said it was really a "wake-up call" to us. Fundraisers have been able to get away with poor fundraising practices in the past because of a booming economy and plenty of donors. But now, when donors are cutting back, our bad habits are coming home to roost. Simone mentioned several bad habits and poor practices that are driving away donors. In fact, she noted that two out of three first-time donors DON'T make another gift! And that we are in a "donor retention crisis" right now with so many of our current donors slipping away because of bad fundraising habits. Did you know that it costs up to 10 times more to secure a NEW DONOR than it does to retain a CURRENT donor? So where do you think we should be spending our time, energy and our focus? Donors think we are treating them like "ATM machines," says Simone. When we go to them for money, money, money, they resent it and reward us by dropping off.

We're in the Dream Business

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Do you ever consider what we fundraising folks are really up to when we appeal to our donors? Is it hype? Is it promises that we will keep? Is it mission, vision and values? Is it changing the world? Last month at the Bridge Fundraising Conference in DC, I kept hearing a theme echoing through many of the presentations I attended. MLK“We are in the dream business.” It really means that we are selling a happy dream of the future. Of a better world. A better community. People being helped. Smiles. Comfort. Happiness. But in our appeals for help, we forget this all too often. Instead we focus on problems, what's wrong, what we will do to fix things. But the most successful approach - whether you are doing fundraising, sales, bringing together groups of people for a common purpose, teamwork - whenever leadership and inspriation are required - is to picture your dream for the future. Think Martin Luther King, one of the greatest inspirational leaders - and orators - of recent times. His "I have a dream speech" is a spectacular example of inspired dreaming. The dream is so powerful that it's like a great river sweeping everyone up in its path, surging inevitably downstream to a much happier future. When we paint a picture of our dream for happy students, healthy children, cared-for elderly, majestic symphonies, clean sparkling water - whatever we are raising money for - we also capture the power of that mighty river of energy sweeping everyone together. When I work with boards, we talk about dreaming. I tell them they should always be standing high on the hill sharing their vision of a happier world with everyone they know. When they are standing on that hill, solid in their dream, focused on the future, they are more powerful than they can imagine. When you, your board members and your volunteers take a firm stand on the mountain, that's when you have the energy and the power to change the world. That's when nothing can stop you.

After You've Asked for the Gift, What Next?

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So you've popped the question to your donor. You've said "We were hoping that you would consider a gift of $XXX to make something wonderful happen."

The Moment of Truth Now, what's next? Did you know that the next person who speaks loses? You've got to allow your donor plenty of time to think it over. The donor is mulling, mulling, not saying anything. And there you sit! Nervous - and as jumpy - as a frog in a frying pan. I know, the urge to start babbling is strong, mighty strong! But KEEP YOUR COOL! The donor may take as long as a full minute to think this over. He or she is considering lots of issues: can I make this gift?' do I really want to make this contribution?; if I donate money to this cause, will they spend it wisely?; what is my cash flow?; can I sell some stock?; can I ask other family members to go in with me?; what's the timing of all this; do I really believe in this project?

How to motivate board members who are uncomfortable opening doors or making connections

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But you CAN change your board members' nervousness and fear. You have to take them through a specific "attitude adjustment" process. You have to change their mind about fundraising - that it's NOT asking for money.