New Search

If you are not happy with the results below please do another search

34 search results for: advice visits

1

How Advice Visits Can Open Any Door in Town

Advice Visits are one of my golden tools to help open doors to prospective donors – and to find out what’s on a donor’s mind.

Advice Visits are based on the old adage:

“If you want someone to give you advice, just ask for money.

If you want money, then ask for advice.”

Asking prospective donors for their opinion and guidance always helps to create a closer relationship between the donor and your organization.

And we all know that good fundraising is all about INVOLVING the donor — not just ASKING for money.

So Advice Visits are part of any good sustainable fundraising program.

Advice Visits practice one of my favorite fundraising rules:

“Treat donors like real people, not like pocketbooks. Ask them for MORE than just money.”

2

Why Board Members Love Advice Visits

Why do board members love Advice Visits?

Because they find them to be a relief.

If you send your board members out into the community connecting with important people and asking for advice, they’ll usually be very happy.

It’s because they don’t have to do a long, detailed presentation. And they are not comfortable doing that. They don’t feel that they know enough.

They ARE comfortable with the idea of seeking advice and input.

After all, they are the community representatives on the board.

It is totally appropriate for your board members to be asking other community leaders for their best thinking on how to achieve the organization’s goals.

They do not have to present a detailed case for support in order to be effective personal advocates for the cause.

3

Three Rules for Successful Advice Visits

Advice Visits are my GOLDEN KEY to opening any donor or potential donor’s heart to my cause.

I wrote about Advice Visits in my newsletter this week. (if you are not a subscriber, you can sign up here.)

I have used Advice Visits time and time again. They are based on the old adage:

“If you want money, ask for advice.

If you want advice, ask for money.”

Rule One: Make Sure You Are Interesting, Not Boring
As you tell your person about your cause and seek his advice, you should be watching carefully for his reaction.

If your prospect seems to not be very interested in your cause, then you should not drag on.. If you are perceived as boring or droning on and on, you will never be welcomed back!

The kiss of death for any fundraiser is to be boring. You are the one listening, not talking!

7

A Fundraiser’s #1 Skill: The Lost Art of Listening

What are the skills the best fundraisers have?

You’d be surprised at my answer: Listening and followup skills are tops on the list.

My recent posts about advice visits and asking donors their impressions are all about listening.

Listen your way to the gift.”

Did you know that listening is actually a gift to the other person?

And who really listens any more?

9

6 Ways to Nail Your Next Major Donor Visit

Here you are, prepping for your big major donor visit. Yay!  As you walk into her office or home, should you be saying: “Yikes! What do I do now?” Don’t fail in your next major donor visit. I’ve seen lots of people strike out when they finally get that coveted appointment with their major donor. […]

13

Karen Mildenhall

I love your cultivation strategy of advice visits. I’ve been having a great time contacting various business leaders asking for their coaching/opinion on making the Grand Canyon Chapter of the Red Cross a success. My approach is to briefly outline what the Red Cross does in our community , and ask what successful practices they […]

14

Karen Mildenhall

I love your cultivation strategy of “advice visits.” I’ve been having a great time contacting various business leaders asking for their coaching/opinion on making the Grand Canyon Chapter of the Red Cross a success. My approach is to briefly outline what the Red Cross does in our community , and ask what successful practices they […]