Hope this works
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Average Gift Size to Haiti is Smaller Than Other Disasters - What That Means to Us

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The Chronicle of Philanthropy reported this week that some international relief organizations said their average gift size to help the Haiti crisis is smaller than after the tsunamis in 2004. The good news is that the number of gifts went up even if the size of the gift was down. iStock_000011708698XSmallFor example, (and I'm quoting from the Chronicle article here:)
In the first 10 weekdays after the earthquake in Haiti, Mercy Corps received 61,505 contributions, compared with 49,561 donations during the same period after the tsunamis. But the average size of the Haiti gifts was $109, compared with $208 for the tsunami gifts.
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The Chronicle's 10 Emerging Trends for 2010

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Today's Chronicle of Philanthropy identified 10 trends that are a bit unnerving. These are outside forces that are making life a challenge to put it lightly for anyone trying to carry out a nonprofit mission. These trends are worrisome at best. They point out warning signs and potholes on the road to a nonprofit's success. I'd much rather see the pundits give us some good news coming down the pike for 2010. Listen, I'm the eternal optimist. There's got to be a way to find something to be hopeful about! : ) Here are the trends that the Chronicle has pointed out: 10 Trends - Emerging Forces for 2010 1) Governments in Crisis - this means that we won't be seeing grants and support from the governmental sector come back anytime soon. Let's just hope that your nonprofit has not over-relied on government support! 2) Strains in the Safety Net - yes, this is troubling. Nonprofits are being asked to fill the gaps in the safety net. Can they do it? 3) A Full-Court Press for Modest Gifts - the mega gifts are really declining. And smart organizations are focusing on smaller gifts from generous donors. 4) Grim Grants Outlook - since foundations' endowments lost so much in the stock market, the funds available for grantees has shrunk considerably for 2010. 5) A Weakened Charity Work Force - ok, so there have been alot of layoffs in our sector and people are straining to do more with less. We can handle it temporarily until things bounce back. 6) A Sharpened Eye on Charity Pay - oversight, transparency, scruitiny - it's all there when examining nonprofit perks! 7) Rising Donor-Charity Tensions - donors are asking for more and more. They want to be able to control their gifts in ways we haven't seen before. 8) Proving That Charity Works - outcomes, results, impact. That's what everybody wants from us. 9) Volunteerism Becomes Cool - here's a bright spot. Helping others is now the new cool. Yes! 10) A Stalled Online Revolution - I don't agree with this one. The online world offers nonprofits incredible tools. We just need to learn how to use it. I don't want to hear words like: grim, stalled, weakened, tensions, strains and crisis, I am currently overdosed on the dark side. Let's look at the opportunities for us all - even in the midst of a challenging year. Last year, I published "7 Reasons for Fundraisers to be Optimistic in 09" in the international AFP newsletter. I promise you that I'll create an even longer list for 2010!
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Holiday Giving Looks Pretty Good

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Hi, I've been on vacation last week on the lovely west coast. My friend Jane Heimerdinger from the `Iolani School in Honolulu, Hawaii invited me to speak at the CASE VII Conference in San Francisco. And I stayed out on the west coast visiting the Napa Valley a few days. Life is good! The Chronicle of Philanthropy columnist Holly Hall just posted an article on the Chronicle's Prospecting blog: "Most Americans Intend to Make Holiday Donations This Year." You know I have been preaching optimism about year-end giving right now - from my perspective, things are looking up. I am seeing a turning tide of not only hopefullness, but clear indications that donors are starting to loosen the strings on their wallets. The Chronicle cited a study by the American Red Cross of over 1000 adults in November that showed the same results. If you can imagine, almost 25% of those polled said that their income had decreased during the recession! But even including those people, 80% of all those surveyed said that their year-end gifts would stay the same (62%) or increase (7%). And only 20% said their giving would cut back. I think it is so very encouraging that the people in this poll said they would economize in other areas in order to keep up their giving. This agrees with other studies earlier in the year that cited the same opinions. We need to remember - Amerians are a generous people. And we are accustomed to giving in the fall and particularly during the holiday season. May your end of year campaign be the best ever! Onward!
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Focus on Individuals if You Want to Reach Your Year-End Fundraising Goals

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I missed yesterday's blog post because I was heading to Harrisburg, PA to deliver the keynote speech for today's Central Pennsylvania AFP Conference. (What a great crowd of fundraisers they are in south-central Pennsylvania!) So now I'm going to catch up! After my keynote and two workshop sessions, I got Kim Klein on the phone for the last interview in the 09 Year-End Strategies Telesummit. As usual, Kim was on target with some eye-opening comments that will help us all. Who's going to pull us out of the recession? Kim wants to remind us that it is really going to be individuals (not corporations,
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Year End Strategy #1: Hold a Thankathon Before You Solicit Your Donors

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Today marks the first of a series of posts on end of the calendar year fundraising strategies. During the month of October, I will be posting a great strategy idea each day. 31 days - 31 strategies - all designed to help you achieve your end of the year fundraising goals. First, I'll be discussing what you should do BEFORE you send your end of year solicitations. Then we'll move on to messaging and solicitation strategies especially designed for the rather unusual environment that we find ourselves in for fall 2009. telephoneEnd of year strategy #1: Hold a thankathon before you solicit your donors. If you really want to prep your donors for their end of calendar year annual solicitations, then thank them for their past gifts, involvement, support, help first. Try holding a mass thank-you session. Bring in your board members, or your volunteers, staff or other donors. Get on the phone and call your donors to thank them for everything they have done to help the (children, students, elderly, poor, hungry, prisoners, sick etc). Don't thank them for helping your organization be successful. Instead thank them for the impact they are making in the world.